GENERAL MEETING, July 15, 2017

Doors open at 12:30 pm with refreshments. Lecture begins at 1:00 pm.

Speaker: Dr. Christopher Lintz, Ph.D.

Lecture Title: HAULING ROCKS AND FIRED CLAY: LATE PREHISTORIC INTERACTIONS AROUND AND BEYOND THE ALIBATES QUARRIES IN THE TEXAS PANHANDLE

Abstract:

Two of the Late Prehistoric period (AD 1200-1500) Plains Village farming groups in the panhandle are the Antelope Creek phase, centered on the Alibates flint quarries in the Canadian River drainage, and the Buried City Complex along Wolf Creek in northeastern part of the panhandle. Both groups lived in similar kinds of stone foundation houses and made cord-marked pottery, but the people of the Buried City Complex made much larger houses and have a much higher incidence of decorated cordmarked pottery. These differences are sufficiently stark to permit archaeologists to draw potentially different kinds of adaptations for the two areas. Attempts to understand and explain the differences between Antelope Creek and Buried City have been elusive.

This talk examines the formation and occurrence of the beautifully banded Alibates chert that was mined by the Antelope Creek people and surveys the distribution exchange of this valuable commodity used for making cutting and scraping implements before the occurrence of metal artifacts. Compiling petrographic and geo-chemical data from pottery sites across the region, I proposes that the Buried City Complex is not a different culture, but rather this functionally specialized area that represents both a rendezvous trade center hosting southern Kansas groups, and a gateway region for keeping foreign groups away from the valuable chert mining quarries in the Canadian River valley.

Bio:

Dr. Christopher Lintz is recently retired as the Wildlife Division archaeologist at Texas parks and Wildlife Division and is currently a Research Associate with Texas State University in San Marcos. He has been an archaeologist since 1963 and participated in and conducted projects in 17 States and Puerto Rico. Since 1970, he has focused his geographical research interests on the southern High Plains with emphasis on ecological anthropology involving paleo-environmental reconstruction, settlement/subsistence patterns, architectural and community patterns, technological trends in lithic resource extraction and tool manufacture, ceramic technology, and exchange/interaction across the Southern Plains region with adjacent areas. His PhD dissertation awarded in 1984 focused on defining the Antelope Creek phase of the Texas-Oklahoma panhandle region. More than 40 of his 350 publications have dealt with investigating facets of the prehistoric human primary activities and adaptations to this region.

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

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GENERAL MEETING, May 20, 2017

Speaker: Thomas R. Hester, PhD

Bio: 

Dr. Hester is a native of Carrizo Springs and now lives in Marble Falls. His
BA is from UT-Austin, and his Ph.D., UC-Berkeley. He taught for more than
30 years at UTSA and at UT-Austin. He has done archaeological research in
Texas, Mexico, Belize, California, and Montana, and is the author of more than
600 published books, monographs and articles on his studies.

Lecture Title: OBSIDIAN AT ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES IN CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN TEXAS;
THEIR GEOLOGICAL SOURCES AND
CULTURAL IMPLICATIONS

Abstract:

Since 1970, the Texas Obsidian Project has analyzed dozens of obsidian flakes, broken bifaces, and arrow points from a wide range of central and south Texas sites The geochemical analyses done through X-ray fluorescence and neutron activation techniques have linked these pieces to distant obsidian outcrops, from southern Idaho to western Mexico. Moreover, the time frame for the obsidian artifacts ranges from Clovis times on up to the Historic era.

Perhaps the most surprising aspect of this project has been the identification of Mexican obsidian sources at about 20 sites in central and south Texas. Some of these sources lie 600-800 miles distant. At one site in Medina County, 4 pieces of obsidian were found  – from 2 different sources in the State of Jalisco, Mexico.

The growing database on Texas obsidian sources has allowed us to assess its cultural meaning in hunter-gatherer groups, yet leaves several mysteries that continue to be pursued.

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Doors open at 12:30 pm with refreshments. Lecture begins at 1:00 pm.

 

 

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GENERAL MEETING, March 18, 2017

Doors open at 12:30 pm with refreshments. Lecture begins at 1:00 pm.

Lecture Title: Hall’s Cave, Kerr County, Texas, A Unique Paleoenvironmental Site with Associated Archeology

Speaker: Steve Stoutamire

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

Hall’s Cave is typical of many caves within the karsted limestones of the Edwards Formation of the Edwards Plateau. It is very atypical, however, in that its sediments have recorded a nearly complete history of at least the last 17,000 years. Within these sediments are remains of plants and animals which lived within the cave or whose remains were washed into the cave or were brought there by carnivores. The cave has been studied by numerous scientists including vertebrate paleontologists, paleobotanists, geologists and archeologists.

Native Americans used the cave and surrounding area intermittently from at least the late Paleo Indian period to the Late Prehistoric period. Studies of the floral and faunal remains within the cave sediments have enabled scientists to interpret Central Texas ancient temperatures and moisture levels, ancient soil cover and depths and, ultimately, past landscapes and floral coverage. Hall’s Cave is considered by some scientists to be the best site in Texas to study ancient environments. It is also considered to be one of the top sites in the United States and the world for these type of studies.

Bio:

Steve Stoutamire is a retired petroleum geologist with an MS in geology from Texas Tech University and a BA in Anthropology/ Archeology from Florida State University. Since retirement in 2007 he has devoted much of his time to the archeology of the hill country of Texas through both site work and public education of professional archeology standards and topics. He is a member, and past president, of the Hill Country Archeology Association (HCAA), member of the Texas Archeology Society and serves as a Texas Archeology Steward for the Texas Historical commission.

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GENERAL MEETING, January 21, 2017, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: The White Shaman Mural: An Enduring Creation Narrative in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of Texas

Speaker: Dr. Carolyn E. Boyd, Research Director

Carolyn Boyd

and founder of Shumla Archaeological Research and Education Center

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

The prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of Texas and Coahuila, Mexico, created some of the most spectacularly complex, colorful, extensive, and enduring rock art of the ancient world. Perhaps the greatest of these masterpieces is the White Shaman mural, an intricate painting that spans some twenty-six feet in length and thirteen feet in height on the wall of a shallow cave overlooking the Pecos River. In discussing the White Shaman Mural, Carolyn E. Boyd takes us on a journey of discovery as she builds a convincing case that the mural tells a story of the birth of the sun and the beginning of time—making it possibly the oldest pictorial creation narrative in North America.

41vv0124_site_tour_0197-95dpiUnlike previous scholars who have viewed Pecos rock art as random and indecipherable, Boyd demonstrates that the White Shaman mural was intentionally composed as a visual narrative, using a graphic vocabulary of images to communicate multiple levels of meaning and function. Drawing on twenty-five years of archaeological research and analysis, as well as insights from ethnohistory and art history, Boyd identifies patterns in the imagery that equate, in stunning detail, to the mythologies of Uto-Aztecan speaking peoples, including the ancient Aztec and the present-day Huichol. This paradigm-shifting identification of core Mesoamerican beliefs in the Pecos rock art reveals that a shared ideological universe was already firmly established among foragers living in the Lower Pecos region as long as four thousand years ago.

Dr. Boyd will be doing a book selling and signing after her presentation.

Bio:

Dr. Carolyn E. Boyd is the Research Director and founder of a nonprofit corporation, Shumla Archaeological Research and Education Center (www.shumla.org). The organization’s mission is to preserve through documentation and education the prehistoric art of southwest Texas and Coahuila, Mexico. She serves as Research Professor at Texas State University. Boyd received her doctorate in archaeology from Texas A&M University based on her analysis of the 4,000 year-old rock art of the Lower Pecos Canyonlands of sWhite Shaman Muralouthwest Texas. She is the author of Rock Art of the Lower Pecos, published in 2003 by Texas A&M University Press and The White Shaman Mural: An Enduring Creation Narrative, available through the University of Texas Press in the fall of 2016. She has published in numerous peer reviewed journals, such as Antiquity, American Antiquity, Latin American Antiquity, Revista Iberoamericana de Lingüística, and Archaeometry and has contributed chapters in several edited volumes. Boyd teaches Field Methods in Rock Art, a three-week field school offered through Texas State University, gives numerous lectures around the country and abroad, serves on graduate committees, and is the Principal Investigator for the Lower Pecos Border Canyonlands Archaeological Project.

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GENERAL MEETING, November 19, 2016, 12:30 pm

Lecture Title: BEYOND BASIC ARCHEOLOGY TRAINING

Speakers: Steve Stoutamire and other Hill Country Archeology Association Principal Investigators will review current and recent HCAA archeological site worksteve-marvin-and-john

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

Steve will describe the training programs which the HCAA has for its members. He will also focus on the advanced training that members can receive in order to qualify as “principal archeologists” to be leaders for archeology field and lab work. Several HCAA members currently in the “PA” training program will present brief highlights of their training as well as the sites they have been assigned to work on.

Bio:

Steve Stoutamire is a retired petroleum geologist with an MS in geology from Texas Tech University and a BA in Anthropology/ Archeology from Florida State University. Since retirement in 2007 he has devoted much of his time to the archeology of the hill country of Texas through both site work and public education of professional archeology standards and topics. He is a member, and past president, of the Hill Country Archeology Association (HCAA), member of the Texas Archeology Society and serves as a Texas Archeology Steward for the Texas Historical commission.

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GENERAL MEETING, September 17, 2016, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: RECENT LUAS PROJECTS

Speakers: Chuck Hixson, Professional Archeologist and member of Llano Uplift Archeological Society, Lisa Weatherford, LUAS president, Jim Wukasch, LUAS Treasurer.

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

Nearly every third Saturday of the month, LUAS schedules a field trip, usually to survey on private ranches for archaeological sites. Occasionally we make return visits to the same site for more long-term investigation. Lisa will give an overview of recent LUAS field trips. Chuck will discuss the Wilson site, an aboriginal camp on the San Saba river that may date to the early historic period. Jim will talk on the Greenleaf Fisk cabin that LUAS recorded in Williamson County. Fisk was an important early Texas pioneer and public official.

Bio:

The quiet but steady force behind many of the Llano Uplift Archeological Society projects, like the Graham-Applegate Site study,  is Chuck Hixson, an archeologist trained in the southwest but knowledgeable about the idiosyncrasies of central Texas prehistory. While attaining his B.A. and M.A. degrees in anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin, HArrowPoints-Graham-ApplegateSiteixson developed a keen interest in southwestern pottery-making technology that developed into a thesis project (his topic was a study of the paint on Mogollon Black-on-White pottery). Today, he has transformed his technical knowledge into an art. Using open firing pits and aboriginal techniques, Hixson produces exquisitely thin-walled, bone-tempered vessels from clays he has collected from throughout the local area.

Graham-Applegate Rancheria
Graham-Applegate Rancheria

Several of his vessels are on display at the Nightengale Archeology Center in Kingsland, providing a startlingly graphic example of the artistic capabilities of the Late Prehistoric peoples in Texas. He also reproduces prehistoric Southwestern pottery of several different styles, including the fine Mimbres Black-on-White.

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GENERAL MEETING, July 16, 2016, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: Reconstructing a 3,500 year old Environmental Record at Carnegie Canyon, Western Oklahoma

Speaker: Dr. Chris Lintz, Archeologist with Texas Parks and Wildlife

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

The title of the talk by Lintz will be, “Reconstructing a 3,500 year old Environmental Record at Carnegie Canyon, Western Oklahoma”. Proposed development of a Soil Conservation Service impoundment in Carnegie Canyon, Oklahoma, provided an opportunity to examine the archeological and past environmental record contained in a 33 foot deep earth-filled canyon in western Oklahoma during the early 1980’s. Although some Archaic through Historic archaeological remains were identified and excavated, the main scientific contribution from this project involves using diverse lines of evidence from soil horizons, snails, and a series of buried tree stumps to develop a model of past environmental conditions occurring in western Oklahoma. The presentation, accompanied by color slides, illustrates for field and analytical work how climatic conditions changed in western Oklahoma during the past 3,500 years.

Bio: Chris Lintz

Guest speaker will be Chris Lintz, PhD, of Austin Texas, who is newly retired from the  Wildlife Division of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. While there, he conducted and oversaw the cultural resource studies on 1,200 square miles in 51 Wildlife Management Areas across Texas and also conducted archeological studies for federally-funded wildlife habitat enhancement grants on private lands. He had conducted archeological projects in many, many states and Puerto Rico in his more than 50-year career. He graduated with a B.A. from Arizona State University, and earned MA and PhD degrees from the University of Oklahoma.

Following refreshments and artifact identification, the meeting will open at 1:00 p.m.

The public and guests are welcome and there is no charge. Membership in HCAA is encouraged.

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GENERAL MEETING, May 21, 2016, 12:30 pm

Lecture Title: “Mission Period Arrow Points and What They May Tell Us About The People”Steve Tomka

Speaker: Dr. Steve Tomka, CRM Project Manager, Raba Kistner Engineering Consultants & former Director of UTSA Center for Archeology Research

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

hafted point-Tomkahafted Guerrero points-TomkaArchaeologists have for a long time assumed that distinct spear and arrow points reflect or are related to distinct groups of people that made them in the past. Many archaeologists disagree with this perspective.  While we do not understand the details of the relationships between people’s identity and the material culture they produce, Tomka will be talking about the implications of historic indigenous groups that joined the Spanish missions of South Texas and the arrow points they made and used. He maintains that the varieties of Guerrero points that are seen in the missions reflect distinct groupings of people that came into the missions from different parts of NE Mexico, South Texas and the Central Coastal Plains.

Bio:

Dr. Tomka earned his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1994. He spent many years in Bolivia studying llama herders at 14,000 feet above sea level. Throughout the years, however, his day job was working in Texas archeology, first at Texas Archeology Research Laboratory at UT-Austin, next at Prewitt and Associates, Inc. a private consulting firm in Austin, and then as Director of the Center  for Archaeological Research, a research facility of the Department of Anthropology at UTSA. He also taught at UTSA. After his years as Director of the Center for Archaeological Research, Department of Anthropology at UTSA, he now does archeology at Raba Kistner Environmental Inc. in San Antonio. He is working on a book on the five missions of San Antonio and is also studying prehistoric ceramics in his spare time. His main interests are stone tool manufacture, use and repair of weapons and their technology.

The public is welcome to attend this meeting and there is no charge.

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GENERAL MEETING – March 19, 2016, 12:30 pm

Lecture Title: Excavations at San Felipe de Austin 2014-2015

Speaker: Jeff Durst, Archeologist, Texas Historical Commission, Austin

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

Mr. Durst presentation will be, “Excavations at San Felipe de Austin 2014-2015”. Excavations at the site of San Felipe de Austin began in June of 2014 as part of the annual Texas Archeological Society (TAS) Field School and continued on in June of 2015. The excavations which took place at the Texas Historical Commission’s San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site, focused on the historic “town lot” 566, where the Farmer’s Hotel was reportedly constructed between 1829 and 1830.  While under construction, the building served as the town hall as described by resident Noah Smithwick in his memoirs. The structure was described as being 32 feet square with a brick cellar 6 feet deep. The first season focused on attempting to locate the four corners of the brick cellar and getting an idea of the construction method of brick outer wall of the cellar. The second season continued the attempt to define the four corners of the cellar and also included a centrally located unit aimed at identifying the floor of the cellar. The two seasons produced an interesting array of artifacts and features which will be discussed during this presentation. San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site is a Texas Historical Commission property, that honors the 1836 founding of Texas. Located on the Brazos River, the site is near the heart of the original township of San Felipe, the first capital of the provisional government of Texas. It was here Stephen F. Austin, the “Father of Texas,” managed the affairs of his colony, which would initially bring 297 families to Texas under a contract with the Mexican government. Click to read more about the history of San Felipe de Austin.

Bio:

Jeff Durst is the Director and Project Reviewer of the Region Four of the Texas Historical Commission. His region covers a large area of southwest Texas. Prior to his current position, Durst served as the project director of THC’s Fort St. Louis Archeological Project. He has experience in both historic and prehistoric archeology and has worked in Texas, New Mexico and Belize, Central America. He was previously employed by the Center for Archaeological Research at the University of Texas at San Antonio and acted as a Project Archeologist conducting archival research, archeological surveys, site excavations, artifact analysis, and report preparations.  Durst has authored and coauthored numerous publications and papers on the archeology of Texas, New Mexico and Belize. Durst has a bachelor’s degree in English literature and a master’s degree in anthropology from the University of Texas at San Antonio.  He has been actively employed in archeology for the past 21 years. His educational research was focused on the prehistoric Maya civilization with a concentration on the archeology of the Maya Lowlands.

There will be artifact identification and light refreshments before the start of the brief business meeting at 1:00 p.m. The public is invited and welcome at this open meeting and there is no charge.

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GENERAL MEETING, January 16, 2016, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: Archaeology Along the San Antonio Parks and Greenway Systems

Speaker: Antonia Figueroa, Project Archeologist, Center Archaeological Research

Location:

Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

As a part of efforts to develop San Antonio parks and Greenway systems, several new hike and bike trail systems have been recently installed throughout the City of San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas. In 2014, the Center for Archaeological Research conducted several archaeological surveys associated with various waterways including Culebra Creek, Helotes Creek, Leon Creek, Olmos Creek and West Elm creeks. Even in cases where archaeological sites were not encountered or sites were considered ineligible for National Register of Historic Places (NRHP), archaeological surveys still contributed to our understanding of site distribution and resource utilization along creeks in South-Central Texas. The development of hike and bike systems by the City of San Antonio provides opportunity to document new cultural resources and add to our knowledge of the distribution of prehistoric sites.

Bio:

AFigueroaMs. Figueroa has 20 years of experience in the field of archaeology. She has conducted an array of academic and CRM field work and research in Texas, Louisiana, Mexico and Belize. Ms. Figueroa has also taught courses in cultural anthropology and Mesoamerican archaeology at Our Lady of the Lake University. She joined the Center for Archaeological Research in 1997. Currently, she performs as a project archaeologist on field projects for the Center. Her research interests include the prehistory of Texas, Spanish colonialism in Texas and Mesoamerica, and Prehispanic Mesoamerica. Figueroa gained her M.A. in Anthropology 2001 at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Here Thesis was “Discerning Patterns of Prehispanic Land Management and Decision Making in Northwestern Belize: A Landscape Approach.”

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GENERAL MEETING, November 21, 2015, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: Archeological Discoveries in San Antonio: Celebrating 300 years!

Speaker:

ElversonBioPic

Matthew Elverson, Archeologist, Office of Historic Preservation, City of San Antonio

Location:

Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Bio:

Matthew Elverson was raised just outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and on the island of Nantucket, Massachusetts. Matthew graduated from Guilford College in Greensboro, North Carolina in 2009 with a B.A. in History. In 2008, he completed his field training in Tuscany at the Poggio Colla Field School. Matthew began his career as an archeologist in Tuscany, Italy where he served as Assistant Supervisor and Field Supervisor on the Mugello Valley Archaeological Project during the summers of 2009-2010. Upon graduation, he served as a field archaeologist for several cultural resource management firms throughout Texas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma.

During the fall of 2011, Matthew enrolled in the Anthropology graduate program at Texas State University-San Marcos, where his research focused on historic archaeology and bioarchaeology. At Texas State, he served as Field Director and Adjunct Professor at the St. George’s Caye Archaeological Field School in St. George’s Caye, Belize. After graduating in 2013, he became the principal investigator for an environmental consulting firm in Austin, ElversonIMG_2680-95dpiTexas. Matthew was hired by the City of San Antonio Office of Historic Preservation in 2014 as the Assistant City Archaeologist. He works closely with the development community and the general public to preserve and protect the rich and diverse cultural fabric of San Antonio.

Abstract:

The City of San Antonio will be celebrating its 300th anniversary in 2018. Recent archaeological investigations in San Antonio, representing the Spanish Colonial to Industrialization time periods, highlight the diverse ElversonIMG_2685-95dpicultural history of the city’s past. Excavations throughout San Antonio, including those at the 1722 site of the presidio, in San Pedro Springs Park, and of Spanish Colonial acequias, offer an insight into the cultural fabric of the city. The rich history of the city has also been enhanced by the recent UNESCO World Heritage Site designation of the five missions in San Antonio. This is the only such designated site in the state of Texas and the 23rd in the United States.

 

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GENERAL MEETING, SEPT 19, 2015  12:30PM

Lecture Title: Recent Discoveries and Insights into

Miller-Jornada Mogollon mask

Prehistoric Ritual and Belief in the Jornada Region of Trans-Pecos Texas

Speaker: Myles Miller, Archeologist with Versar/Geo-Marine

Location:

Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Bio:

Myles Miller has been professionally involved with the prehistory of the Jornada Mogollon peoples and Trans-Pecos regions since returning to El Paso upon completion of graduate school in 1983. He first became interested in the region during elementary school while accompanying members of the El Paso Archaeological Society during trips to prehistoric sites across southern New Mexico and northern Chihuahua. For the past 30 years he has conducted research and cultural resources management projects throughout the region and has participated in numerous excavations of prehistoric and historic Native American settlements in west Texas, southern New Mexico, and southeastern Arizona. He presently serves as a Principal Investigator with Versar (formerly Geo-Marine, Inc.) and supervises archeological consulting work at Fort Bliss.

Abstract:

During the past five years, archaeological and iconographic studies have revealed a rich record of prehistoric ritual and belief in the Jornada region of west Texas and southern New Mexico. Evidence of ritual behavior has been found in pueblo villages, in icons painted on rock art panels and ceramic vessels, in thMiller-Slide2e construction of shrines, and even burned rock middens. Studies of Jornada-style rock art have provided insights into complex belief systems involving animated, sacred landscapes. Analysis of crystals, minerals, fossils, and pigments in ritual deposits in pueblo rooms has identified links with mountains and caves. Together, these studies have explored Jornada cosmology as revealed through ritual landscapes of the region, including natural and cultural features as shrines, caves, and rockshelters. Caves and mountains have several interMiller-Slide1related metaphorical and symbolic meanings, including fertility, access to the underworld, and places of emergence of spirits and water, lighting, clouds, and rain. ( See Texas Beyond Historic website for more information on the Jornada Mogollon culture http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/firecracker/mogollon.html).

 

 

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HCAA GENERAL MEETING, July 18, 2015, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: Caddo Indian Culture of East

ShovelSculputer-MarceauxTexasShawnMarceaux-UTSA-CAR

Speaker: Paul Shawn Marceaux, Ph.D. Director, Center for Archeological Research, University of Texas, San Antonio

Location:

Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Bio: Paul Shawn Marceaux, Ph.D.

Abstract:

CaddoIndian-95dpiThis exciting lecture discusses a tribe of prehistoric Texas Indians that we know a great deal about—the Caddo Indians!!! ThCaddoIndianVillage95dpie word for “Texas” comes from the Caddo Indian Culture of east Texas. This culture was based on agriculture and is rich in materials and traditions, especially pottery and body ornamentation. The Caddo Indian lifeways will be discussed before and after the Spanish arrived in Texas in the 1500’s. The Caddo were liked by the Spanish for their friendly ways and similar material cultural.HistoricCaddo-EuropeanTradeGoodsLinks3

HCAA GENERAL MEETING, May 16, 2015, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: Mexican Influence in Mimbres

Mimbres pottery bowls

Culture of Southwest New Mexico and Beyond

Speaker: Harry Shafer, Ph.D, Professor Emeritus, Texas A&M University

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

The Mimbres culture of southwest New Mexico is best known for its exquisite painted pottery. The imagery and iconography on the pottery reveals much about this ancient formative culture that traditionally has been defined as a distinctive region within the broader Mogollon cultural sphere.

fish-bird Mimbres Potterymimbres Pottery bat

 

Bio:

HShafer-95dpiShafer was the first archaeologist to join the faculty of Texas A&M University’s College of Liberal Arts, and he has been active in archeological research since 1962. He is author of “Mimbres Archaeology at the NAN Ranch Ruin” and “Ancient Texans: Rock Art and “Lifeways along the Lower Pecos”; and the co-author of “Field Methods in Archaeology”; and “Maya Tools”; and the author or co-author of over 300 articles and book chapters. Shafer is curator of the Archaeology Center at the Witte Museum. He continues to lecture and write about archeology and is the co-owner, with Dr. Thomas Hester, of Abasolo Archaeology Consultants. He lives in San Antonio, Texas.

Artifact identification and a brief social time with refreshments will precede the business meeting and speaker starting at 1:00 p.m. The public is invited to hear this honored and interesting speaker at no charge.

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HCAA GENERAL MEETING, March 21, 2015, 12:30pm

Lecture Title:

“Neanderthal Intelligence and the Mousterian Tradition: Middle Stone Age Tools and Neanderthal Survival”

NeanderthalIntelligence

Speaker: Dr. Craig Mayer, President, Vinovium PartnersCraigMayer
Location: Riverside Nature Center

150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

Craig’s talk will be: “Neanderthal Intelligence and the Mousterian Tradition: Middle Stone Age Tools and Neanderthal Survival”. This presentation will focus on Neanderthal tool development and the keen intelligence needed to create such sophisticated tools, with particular emphasis on the Mousterian Tradition and Levallois technique. He will also touch on the highly influential French archaeologist, Francois Bordes, and his Paleolithic tool typology. The talk will compare Mousterian flake tools with Aurignacian blade tools (a tradition used by fully modern forms of people, i.e., Homo Sapiens) and will review the climatic conditions in which Neanderthals lived and their adaptations to varying climatic conditions and environments over several hundred thousand years.

Bio:

DR. CRAIG MAYER started his career as an Associate Professor teaching anthropology/archaeology at SMU. Mayer holds a BA and MA in Anthropology from SMU and a Diploma in Archaeology (MA equivalent) from Durham University in England. Currently he works in information technology and building the Texas wine industry as president of Vinovium Partners.

ADDITIONAL DETAILS ABOUT OUR MARCH SPEAKER

 

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HCAA GENERAL MEETING, January 17, 2015, 12:30pm

Lecture Title:

“Prehistoric Plains Indian Interactions Based on Exotic Artifacts from Central Texas”

Speaker: Dr. Chris Lintz, Archeologist with Texas Parks and Wildlife Depart., Austin, Texas

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

CLintzDr. Chris Lintz

 

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HCAA GENERAL MEETING, November 15, 2014, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: Mexican Influence in Mimbres

Mimbres pottery bowlsCulture of Southwest New Mexico and Beyond

Speaker: Harry Shafer, Ph.D, Professor Emeritus, Texas A&M University

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

The Mimbres culture of southwest New Mexico is best known for its exquisite painted pottery. The imagery and iconography on the pottery reveals much about this ancient formative culture that traditionally has been defined as a distinctive region within the broader Mogollon cultural sphere.

fish-bird Mimbres Potterymimbres Pottery bat

 

Bio:

HShafer-95dpiShafer was the first archaeologist to join the faculty of Texas A&M University’s College of Liberal Arts, and he has been active in archeological research since 1962. He is author of “Mimbres Archaeology at the NAN Ranch Ruin” and “Ancient Texans: Rock Art and “Lifeways along the Lower Pecos”; and the co-author of “Field Methods in Archaeology”; and “Maya Tools”; and the author or co-author of over 300 articles and book chapters. Shafer is curator of the Archaeology Center at the Witte Museum. He continues to lecture and write about archeology and is the co-owner, with Dr. Thomas Hester, of Abasolo Archaeology Consultants. He lives in San Antonio, Texas.

Artifact identification and a brief social time with refreshments will precede the business meeting and speaker starting at 1:00 p.m. The public is invited to hear this honored and interesting speaker at no charge.

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HCAA GENERAL MEETING, Sept 20, 2014, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: Rock Art and Sacred Contexts in the Lower Pecos

Speaker: Jeremy Freeman, Staff Archeologist, Shumla Archaeological Research & Education Center, Comstock, Texas

Location: Riverside Nature Center – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

The Lower Pecos region of southwestern Texas retains hundreds of rock art sites dating from the Late Archaic through Contact periods. These sites represent a cultural system of inter-connected sites, a manifestation of the cosmology of the hunter-gatherer people that inhabited the region throughout prehistory. Embedded within these murals is significant cultural information that was disseminated to the members of prehistoric societies. Since 2009 Shumla Archaeological Research & Education Center has been documenting the rock art and working to identify patterns in the motifs. Aided by ethnographic analogy and modern technology patterns are beginning to emerge that are being used to interpret the underlying meaning and symbolism behind these prehistoric cosmologies. This lecture will include a discussion on the methods Shumla is using to unravel the mysteries of the rock art and current interpretations on the meaning underlying the imagery.

Bio:

JFreeman95dpiJeremy received his B.A. from Heidelberg College in anthropology and his graduate studies at Ball State University in anthropology. He has worked as a professional archaeologist for over 14 years that includes work in cultural resource management, museums, and non-profit organizations. He has worked on archaeological projects throughout the Midwest, northeast, southeast, and southwestern United States. Jeremy has been actively engaged in public outreach through public archaeology programs and educational outreach, teaching school kids archaeological methods and material culture. Jeremy has taught collegiate level students in anthropology; these courses included: Introduction to Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, Physical Anthropology, Introduction to Archaeology, and Archaeology and Culture. Jeremy is currently a staff archaeologist at Shumla Archaeological Research & Education Center in Comstock, Texas where he has been involved in the Border Canyonlands Archaeological Project (BCAP). This long-term study focuses on the study and conservation of the rock art of the lower Pecos region. Jeremy also guides tours for the Rock Art Foundation and Seminole Canyon State Historic Park.

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HCAA GENERAL MEETING, July 26, 2014, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: Field Work at Eagle Nest Rock Shelter, Mile Canyon 2014

SpeakerSteve Stoutamire, Geologist, Anthropologist and Member of Hill Country Archeological Association, Kerrville, Texas

Location: Riverside Nature Center  – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:EagleNestRockShelter

Steve will be presenting his experiences and what was discovered while working with Dr. Steve Black, and other archeologists and graduate students from Texas State University investigating the archeology aEagleNestRockShelter2nd rock art of Eagle Nest Rock Shelter, near Langtry Texas. This is in the Lower Pecos Region where the desert environment and rock shelters have preserved so much of the material culture of prehistoric peoples over the last 12,000 years—it is hard to believe!!! This project was supported in part by our own Tom Miller!!!

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HCAA GENERAL MEETING, May 17, 2014, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: North America Before Clovis

Speaker: Dr. Michael Collins, Research Anthropology, Texas State University (learn more)

Location: Riverside Nature Center  – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

Abstract:

The Gault and Friedkin Sites in Central Texas comprise a small but important part of an emerging mosaic of seven distinct temporal-spatial patterns in thGault Site Mammoth Jawe older-than-Clovis archaeological record of clovis pointsNorth America. This record begins more than 20,000 years ago and places Clovis near the middle, rather than the beginning, of the span North American Prehistory. Of particular interest is the diverse adaptations and the specific environments for each pattern.

Biographic Sketch:

Dr Michael CollinsDr Collins at Gault Site

Michael B. Collins, PhD, Research Professor of Anthropology at Texas State University, is a prehistorian specializing in the study of the earliest cultures in the Western Hemisphere from the perspective of geoarchaeology, stone tool technology, and diverse archaeological approaches. His current research stance has developed over the more than 50 years of his archaeological career, beginning in West Texas during the drought of the 1950s. Wind erosion laid bare vast areas of the Southern Plains, exposing fossils of Pleistocene mastodons, mammoths, camels, horses, and bison and many archaeological sites of all ages. Fascination with these finds stimulated an interest that has led Collins to work in the Near East and Europe as well as North, Central, and South America. He has published close to 200 articles, book chapters, reports, reviews, and monographs, many of which relate to the archaeology of Texas.

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HCAA GENERAL MEETING, March 15, 2014, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: The Gatlin Site (41KR621) in Kerrville:

Prehistoric Living Re-visited

Speaker: Eric Oksanen (See Bio)

Location: Riverside Nature Center  – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

EricOksanenEricOksanen2

The Gatlin Site spans more than 6,000 years of human activity. Who did what, when, how, and why? Sifting through the enormous assemblage of artifacts and features, we examine how the site was used and changed through time and critique the decisions made in the analyses.

 

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HCAA GENERAL MEETING, January 18, 2014, 12:30pm

Lecture Title: Alibates Flint Quarrying & Disperal !!!!

Speaker: Dr. Christopher Lintz

Location: Riverside Nature Center  – 150 Francisco Lemos, Kerrville, Texas 78028

alibates-points-TBH
Alibates Points-TBH (Photo from Texas Beyond History)

Speaker will be Dr. Christopher Lintz, Archeologist for the Wildlife Division of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department, Austin. He will discuss recent studies on the location of Alibates flint deposits in Texas; and prehistoric Indian quarrying methods,  and movement of Alibates out of the Panhandle to as far away as Oklahoma and Kansas.

 
Click for more information on prehistoric use of Alibates Flint!!