HCAA General Meeting – March 19, 2022

Attention: Note time and location!

Location:

Union Church, 101 Travis Street, Kerrville TX 78028

Time:

Doors open at 11 am. Program to begin at 11:30 am.

Title:

The Jack Allen Site:  The 1969-1970 Investigations at a Pickett-Post house in the Texas Panhandle: Explorations in Cultural Variations

Speaker:

Christopher Lintz, PhD. Former Archeologist with Texas Parks & Wildlife, currently Research Associate at the Center for Archaeological Studies at Texas State University in San Marcos and Archeological Steward with Texas Historical Commission   

Abstract:

Excavations conducted during 1969-1970 investigated a ca. 650-year-old adobe and picket-post house affiliated with the Antelope Creek phase (A.D. 1200-1500). The intensity of fire that burned the house baked the adobe daub that covered the walls and much of the adobe roof. While most of the other semi-subterranean residential houses of this distinctive culture are only known from their foundation footprints, the preservation of burned adobe allowed for a reconstruction of the building’s superstructure. 

This talk focuses on the initial excavation procedures, and the subsequent studies of the preserved daub were conducted to infer what a typical house looked like. The Jack Allen house is compared to variability of house foundations found in other Antelope Creek phase house excavations within the Texas and Oklahoma panhandle.

Bio:

Christopher Lintz received his M.A. (1975) and Ph.D. (1984) in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma and his B.A. in Anthropology from Arizona State University (1970).  He has conducted and directed cultural resource management archaeology in 17 States and Puerto Rico over a 36-year career for various university and private consulting firms in the private sector.  In 2006, he became the first full-time archaeologist for the Wildlife Division of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department where he both managed cultural resource projects on some 51 Wildlife Management Areas across 1,200 square miles of Texas, and coordinated cultural resource consultation for federal grants for habitat restoration projects on private lands.  He retired after 10 years from TPWD in 2016 and is currently a Research Associate at the Center for Archaeological Studies at Texas State University in San Marcos.    

Since 1970, he has focused his research interests on the southern High Plains with emphasis on ecological anthropology involving paleo-environmental reconstruction, human adaptation, settlement/subsistence patterns, architectural and community patterns, technological trends in lithic resource extraction and tool manufacture, ceramic technology, and regional exchange/interaction across the Southern Plains region with adjacent areas, especially during the Late Prehistoric Period of A.D. 1200 to 1500.  He has written more than 350 archeological reports, articles and book chapters, and often writes up reports on unpublished excavations in museums, and private collections that dovetail with his research topics.

He is a Steward volunteer for the Texas Historical Commission. Several of his projects have been recognized with by the THC as recipients of a Merit in Archaeology Awards.  He has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Panhandle Archaeological Society, the Lifetime Membership Award from the Hill Country Archeological Society, a Fellow of the Texas Archaeological Society.  His contributions to the archeology of the Texas-Oklahoma panhandle have been recognized by the Distinguished Service Award from the Plains Anthropological Society, and the Curtis Tunnell Lifetime Achievement Award from the THC.

Please mark your calendars for 11 am, March 19, 2022, at the Union Church, Kerrville, Texas!!! This is a live Face to Face meeting, wearing masks is optional.

Hope to see you there. Chris is a great speaker, and we look forward to learning more about the prehistoric Indian culture on the Panhandle Plains of Texas!

Your Hill Country Archeological Association, Board of Directors